Effect of the Extended Inverted Classroom on clinical simulation for the resuscitation of trauma patients: Pilot study of student perceptions of learning

  • Luis Carlos Domínguez Surgery Department, Universidad de la Sabana, Chía, Colombia
  • Diego Sierra Surgery Department, Universidad de la Sabana, Chía, Colombia
  • Gonzalo Moros Surgery Department, Universidad de la Sabana, Chía, Colombia
  • Juan José Pepín Surgery Department, Universidad de la Sabana, Chía, Colombia
  • Angélica Villarraga IMS - Clinical Simulation, Universidad de la Sabana, Chía, Colombia
Keywords: Wounds and injuries, Colombia, Learning, Simulation, Cardiopulmonary resuscitation

Abstract

Introduction:

The inverted classroom is an interactive teaching model with promising results in surgery. Evidence of this model involving components of clinical simulation is scant.

Objective:

To present a model of "Extended Inverted Classroom" (EIC), involving low and medium fidelity simulation, and to describe its effect on student perceptions of learning.

Methods:

An EIC was designed for teaching medical students the clinical skills for the management and resuscitation of trauma patients. The pre- and post-interventional perceptions Wounds and injuries of learning were assessed using the "Flipped Classroom Perception Instrument" validated in the Spanish language. The Mann-Whitney test and the t-test (p < .05) were used for comparisons and Cohen's d was used for calculating the effect size of the intervention. Secondary outcomes were academic performance and student satisfaction.

Results:

A total of 75 students participated in the study. Global perception of learningwas 3.98 士0.58 (1.5-5.0) (pre-test) versus 4.24±0.64 (1.38-5.0) (post-test) (p <.05). The effect size was d = 0.42 (95% CI 0.094H0.75). High academic achievement and student satisfaction were identified.

Conclusions:

The EIC model involving clinical simulation for the resuscitation of trauma patients has a positive effect on student perceptions of learning in the short term. Further studies are required to evaluate this model in other scenarios of resuscitation, critical care and emergencies, as well as to measure their effect on long-term learning.

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How to Cite
1.
Domínguez LC, Sierra D, Moros G, Pepín JJ, Villarraga A. Effect of the Extended Inverted Classroom on clinical simulation for the resuscitation of trauma patients: Pilot study of student perceptions of learning. Colomb. J. Anesthesiol. [Internet]. 2017Oct.1 [cited 2021May10];45(Supplement):4-11. Available from: https://www.revcolanest.com.co/index.php/rca/article/view/171

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Published
2017-10-01
How to Cite
1.
Domínguez LC, Sierra D, Moros G, Pepín JJ, Villarraga A. Effect of the Extended Inverted Classroom on clinical simulation for the resuscitation of trauma patients: Pilot study of student perceptions of learning. Colomb. J. Anesthesiol. [Internet]. 2017Oct.1 [cited 2021May10];45(Supplement):4-11. Available from: https://www.revcolanest.com.co/index.php/rca/article/view/171
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