What is the need to place a vascular access for anaesthetic procedures in children?

  • Piedad Cecilia Echeverry-Marín Instituto de Ortopedia Infantil Roosevelt, Colombia
  • María Cristina Mondragón-Duque Third-year Resident of Anaesthesia, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia
  • José Joaquín Meza-Padilla Third-year Resident of Anaesthesia, Universidad de Cartagena, Bolívar, Colombia
Keywords: Catheters, Patient safety, Operating room, Anesthesia, Child

Abstract

Introduction:

Vascular access in children has been considered an essential part of safe in paediatric anaesthesia. However, it requires great skill and it has risks and complications. There is a current controversy about when it is required, especially in patients in whom access is difficult and are scheduled for minor and short-term procedures.

Objective:

To reflect on the factors that must be considered regarding the placement of peripheral vascular access in children for peri-operative management, and to provide tools to help with the decision of placing a vascular access.

Methodology:

A non systematic review was made to find the indications and risks of vascular access; and a reflection on the main considerations to think about when it is necessary to place a vascular access in children.

Results:

The review of the literature resulted in relevant considerations that need to be emphasised when deciding to place a vascular access in children.

Conclusion:

The risk and benefit of any intervention in children should be assessed. The final decision to place a venous access for peri-operative management of children depends on patient age, degree of difficulty of the vascular access, type of procedure, duration and, finally, the anaesthetist's own perception of safety. Individual experience counts when it comes to the final decision.

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How to Cite
1.
Echeverry-Marín PC, Mondragón-Duque MC, Meza-Padilla JJ. What is the need to place a vascular access for anaesthetic procedures in children?. Colomb. J. Anesthesiol. [Internet]. 2017Oct.1 [cited 2021Dec.5];45(Supplement):64-8. Available from: https://www.revcolanest.com.co/index.php/rca/article/view/230

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Published
2017-10-01
How to Cite
1.
Echeverry-Marín PC, Mondragón-Duque MC, Meza-Padilla JJ. What is the need to place a vascular access for anaesthetic procedures in children?. Colomb. J. Anesthesiol. [Internet]. 2017Oct.1 [cited 2021Dec.5];45(Supplement):64-8. Available from: https://www.revcolanest.com.co/index.php/rca/article/view/230

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