Levobupivacaine or ropivacaine: A randomised double blind controlled trial using equipotent doses in spinal anaesthesia

  • Manazir Athar Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, UP, India
  • Syed Moied Ahmed Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, UP, India
  • Shahna Ali Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, UP, India
  • Kashmiri Doley Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, UP, India
  • Ankur Varshney Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, UP, India
  • Mohd. Masood Hussain Siddiqi Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, UP, India
Keywords: Anesthesia spinal, Anesthetics local, Hemodynamics, Bupivacaine, Anesthesia.

Abstract

Introduction: Levobupivacaine and ropivacaine are relatively new local anaesthetics developed in order to address the issue of bupivacaine toxicity Although certain differences do exist between their pharmacological profiles, its clinical relevance at equipotent doses is not evident so far

Objective: To compare the efficacy and characteristics of equipotent doses of intrathecal levobupivacaine with ropivacaine

Methodology: Sixty ASA grade I/II patients of 18-60 years, either sex posted for lower limb orthopaedic surgery under spinal anaesthesia were randomly given either 15 mg levobupivacaine or 22.5 mg ropivacaine. Sensory and motor block, haemodynamic characteristics, as well as any side effects, were recorded

Results: Onset of sensory block to T10 was more rapid in group R than group L, < 0.0001. The median (range) height achieved in group R was T7 (T5-T10) while in group L was T7 (T4-T10). Time to reach maximum height and time to modified Bromage grade 3 was shorter in group R as compared to group L, < 0.0001. Levobupivacaine produced significantly longer (290.50 ± 34.67) duration of motor block compared to ropivacaine (222.50 ± 23.00). Duration of analgesia was significantly longer in group L (309.83 ± 36.45) than group R (249.50 ± 22.83). No serious adverse effects were recorded.

Conclusion: Levobupivacaine produces significantly longer duration of analgesia than ropivacaine when used in a ratio of 0.6:1. Efficacy, toxicity and haemodynamic profile make ropivacaine suitable agent for surgeries with low threshold for hypotension.

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How to Cite
1.
Athar M, Moied Ahmed S, Ali S, Doley K, Varshney A, Hussain Siddiqi MM. Levobupivacaine or ropivacaine: A randomised double blind controlled trial using equipotent doses in spinal anaesthesia. Colomb. J. Anesthesiol. [Internet]. 2016Apr.1 [cited 2021May12];44(2):97–104. Available from: https://www.revcolanest.com.co/index.php/rca/article/view/453

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2016-04-01
How to Cite
1.
Athar M, Moied Ahmed S, Ali S, Doley K, Varshney A, Hussain Siddiqi MM. Levobupivacaine or ropivacaine: A randomised double blind controlled trial using equipotent doses in spinal anaesthesia. Colomb. J. Anesthesiol. [Internet]. 2016Apr.1 [cited 2021May12];44(2):97–104. Available from: https://www.revcolanest.com.co/index.php/rca/article/view/453
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