Relationship among mental models, theories of change, and metacognition: structured clinical simulation

  • Diego Andrés Díaz-Guio Centro de Simulación Clínica Vital Care, Armenia, Colombia.
  • Francisco Javier Ruiz-Ortega Universidad de Caldas, Manizales, Colombia.
Keywords: Simulation Training, Models, Psychological, Metacognition, Models Educational, Formative Feedback

Abstract

Learning is a change in the way of thinking that lasts over time and allows for solving problems; on the other hand, education based on structured clinical simulation is a pedagogic mediation between the classroom and clinical practice, which allows experience, reflection, monitoring, control, and restructuring of thought, which can contribute to deep and lasting learning. It is desirable that students, both undergraduate and graduate, are given the opportunity to be trained under structured simulation.

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How to Cite
1.
Díaz-Guio DA, Ruiz-Ortega FJ. Relationship among mental models, theories of change, and metacognition: structured clinical simulation. Colomb. j. anesthesiol. [Internet]. 2019Apr.1 [cited 2020Sep.29];47(2):113 -16. Available from: https://www.revcolanest.com.co/index.php/rca/article/view/274

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Published
2019-04-01
How to Cite
1.
Díaz-Guio DA, Ruiz-Ortega FJ. Relationship among mental models, theories of change, and metacognition: structured clinical simulation. Colomb. j. anesthesiol. [Internet]. 2019Apr.1 [cited 2020Sep.29];47(2):113 -16. Available from: https://www.revcolanest.com.co/index.php/rca/article/view/274
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