Mortality and hyperchloremia in the intensive care unit

  • Ronald Antonio Medina-Lombo a. Department of Critical Medicine and Intensive Care, Fundación Universitaria de Ciencias de la Salud (FUCS), Hospital Infantil San José, Bogotá, Colombia. b. Specialization in Clinical Epidemiology, Fundación Universitaria de Ciencias de la Salud (FUCS), Bogotá, Colombia
  • Víctor Leonardo Sánchez-García Specialization in Clinical Epidemiology, Fundación Universitaria de Ciencias de la Salud (FUCS), Bogotá, Colombia
  • Luisa Fernanda Gómez-Gómez a. Specialization in Clinical Epidemiology, Fundación Universitaria de Ciencias de la Salud (FUCS), Bogotá, Colombia. b. Anesthesiology and Resuscitation, Fundación Universitaria de Ciencias de la Salud (FUCS), Hospital de San José, Bogotá, Colombia
  • Silvio Andrés Vidal-Bonilla Critical Medicine and Intensive Care, Fundación Universitaria de Ciencias de la Salud (FUCS), Hospital Infantil San José, Bogotá, Colombia.
  • Juan José Castro-Castro Critical Medicine and Intensive Care, Fundación Universitaria de Ciencias de la Salud (FUCS), Hospital Infantil San José, Bogotá, Colombia.
  • Guillermo Sánchez-Vanegas Anesthesiology and Resuscitation Fundación Universitaria de Ciencias de la Salud (FUCS), Hospital de San José, Bogotá, Colombia
Keywords: Mortality, Critical Care, Blood-Derivative Drugs, Hypovolemia, Kidney Diseases

Abstract

Introduction:

Administrating intravenous fluids is one of the most frequent practices in the care of critically ill patients, since most of them present shock or hypotension from any cause. The rapid and aggressive administration of these fluids may lead to adverse results, including acute renal failure and hydroelectrolytic disorders which are highly associated with fatal outcomes.

Objectives:

To establish the association between hyperchloremia and mortality in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of Hospital Universitario de San José between August 2013 and January 2017, in addition to their demographic characteristics, the incidence of chloride abnormalities, and its association to renal failure.

Methods:

Analytic retrospective cohort study in the adult ICU at the Hospital Universitario de San José from August 1, 2013 to January 31, 2017.

Results:

A total of 839 patients were evaluated, 210 exposed and 629 not exposed. The relative risk of death for those who developed hyperchloremia was 3.12 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.16^.49) (P <0.001). The multivariate analysis generated an hazard ratio of 2.31 (95% CI 1.47-3.63) adjusted for age, sex, APACHE II at admission, sepsis, neurocritical state, and development of renal failure.

Conclusion:

Hyperchloremia is a frequent event in patients in the ICU; it may act as an independent variable for mortality in critical patients.

References

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How to Cite
1.
Medina-Lombo RA, Sánchez-García VL, Gómez-Gómez LF, Vidal-Bonilla SA, Castro-Castro JJ, Sánchez-Vanegas G. Mortality and hyperchloremia in the intensive care unit. Colomb. J. Anesthesiol. [Internet]. 2018Jul.1 [cited 2021Apr.22];46(3):218-23. Available from: https://www.revcolanest.com.co/index.php/rca/article/view/525

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Published
2018-07-01
How to Cite
1.
Medina-Lombo RA, Sánchez-García VL, Gómez-Gómez LF, Vidal-Bonilla SA, Castro-Castro JJ, Sánchez-Vanegas G. Mortality and hyperchloremia in the intensive care unit. Colomb. J. Anesthesiol. [Internet]. 2018Jul.1 [cited 2021Apr.22];46(3):218-23. Available from: https://www.revcolanest.com.co/index.php/rca/article/view/525
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