Cognitive load in academic clinical simulation activities. Cross-sectional study

  • Mariana González La Rotta Anesthesiology Department, Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá. Bogotá, Colombia. https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4552-8979
  • Valentina Mazzanti Practice Center, Universidad de los Andes. Bogotá, Colombia.
  • Laura Serna Rivas Practice Center, Universidad de los Andes. Bogotá, Colombia. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8127-4059
  • Carlos Alberto Triana Schoonewolff Anesthesiology Department, Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá. Bogotá, Colombia.
Keywords: Medical education, Patient simulation, Task load, Learning, Anesthesiology

Abstract

Introduction: Cognitive load determines working memory ability to store and retain information in long-term memory, thus conditioning learning.

Objective: To compare cognitive loads among different simulation activities, including anesthesia and surgery simulation workshops in medical students.

Methods: Cross-sectional analytical observational study. Two cognitive load measurement scales (Paas and NASA-TLX) were given to the students after each simulation workshop. Comparisons were made based on the scores derived from the scales.

Results: Relevant differences were found in terms of the mental effort assessed by means of the Paas scale, as relates to student rotation order in the airway management workshop, with a greater effort being found in the group that rotated initially in surgery (6.19 vs. 5.53; p = 0.029). The workshop with the highest associated rate of frustration was the airway management workshop. Higher scores were obtained for this workshop in all the items of the NASA-TLX scale, reflecting a higher cognitive load when compared to the others.

Conclusion: It was not possible to determine whether higher scores in some of the activities were associated with the inherent difficulty of airway management or the specific workshop design. Consequently, further studies are required to distinguish between those components in order to improve the way learning activities are designed.

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How to Cite
1.
González La Rotta M, Mazzanti V, Serna Rivas L, Triana Schoonewolff CA. Cognitive load in academic clinical simulation activities. Cross-sectional study. Colomb. J. Anesthesiol. [Internet]. 2022 Jun. 22 [cited 2022 Oct. 3];50(4). Available from: https://www.revcolanest.com.co/index.php/rca/article/view/1044

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Published
2022-06-22
How to Cite
1.
González La Rotta M, Mazzanti V, Serna Rivas L, Triana Schoonewolff CA. Cognitive load in academic clinical simulation activities. Cross-sectional study. Colomb. J. Anesthesiol. [Internet]. 2022 Jun. 22 [cited 2022 Oct. 3];50(4). Available from: https://www.revcolanest.com.co/index.php/rca/article/view/1044
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