Hemodynamic monitoring with two blood gases: “a tool that does not go out of style”

  • Jesús Salvador Sánchez-Díaz Intensive Care, High Specialty Medical Unit, No. 14 Specialties Hospital, "Adolfo Ruiz Cortines” National Medical Center, Mexican Social Security Institute. Veracruz, Mexico. http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1744-9077
  • Karla Gabriela Peniche-Moguel Intensive Care, High Specialty Medical Unit, No. 14 Specialties Hospital, "Adolfo Ruiz Cortines” National Medical Center, Mexican Social Security Institute. Veracruz, Mexico.
  • Gerardo Rivera-Solís Intensive Care, High Specialty Medical Unit, No. 14 Specialties Hospital, "Adolfo Ruiz Cortines” National Medical Center, Mexican Social Security Institute. Veracruz, Mexico.
  • Enrique Antonio Martínez-Rodríguez Anesthesiology, Centro Médico ABC. Mexico City, Mexico.
  • Luis Del-Carpio-Orantes Internal Medicine, Zona No.71 General Hospital, Mexican Social Security Institute. Veracruz, Mexico.
  • Orlando Rubén Pérez-Nieto Intensive Care Unit, San Juan del Río General Hospital. Querétaro, Mexico.
  • Eder Iván Zamarrón-López Intensive Care Unit, Angeles Hospital. Tampico, Mexico.
  • Manuel Alberto Guerrero-Gutiérrez Anesthesiology, General Hospital, National La Raza Medical Center,Mexican Social Security Institute. Mexico City, Mexico.
  • Enrique Monares-Zepeda Intensive Care, ABC Medical Center. Mexico City, Mexico.
Keywords: Hemodynamic monitoring, Blood gas, Cardiac output, Carbon dioxide, Microcirculation

Abstract

Introduction. Hemodynamic monitoring of a critically ill patient is an indispensable tool both inside and outside intensive care; we currently have invasive, minimally invasive and non-invasive devices; however, no device has been shown to have a positive impact on the patient's evolution; arterial and venous blood gases provide information on the patient's actual microcirculatory and metabolic status and may be a hemodynamic monitoring tool.

Objective. To carry out a non-systematic review of the literature of hemodynamic monitoring carried out through the variables obtained in arterial and venous blood gases.

Material and methods. A non-systematic review of the literature was performed in the PubMed, OvidSP and ScienceDirect databases with selection of articles from 2000 to 2019.

Results. It was found that there are variables obtained in arterial and venous blood gases such as central venous oxygen saturation (SvcO2), venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide pressure (∆pv-aCO2), venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide pressure/arteriovenous oxygen content difference (∆pv-aCO2/∆Ca-vO2) that are related to cellular oxygenation, cardiac output (CO), microcirculatory veno-arterial flow and anaerobic metabolism and allow to assess tissue perfusion status.

Conclusion. The variables obtained by arterial and venous blood gases allow for non-invasive, accessible and affordable hemodynamic monitoring that can guide medical decision-making in critically ill patients.

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How to Cite
1.
Sánchez-Díaz JS, Peniche-Moguel KG, Rivera-Solís G, Martínez-Rodríguez EA, Del-Carpio-Orantes L, Pérez-Nieto OR, Zamarrón-López EI, Guerrero-Gutiérrez MA, Monares-Zepeda E. Hemodynamic monitoring with two blood gases: “a tool that does not go out of style”. Colomb. j. anesthesiol. [Internet]. 2020Aug.28 [cited 2020Sep.23];49:e928. Available from: https://www.revcolanest.com.co/index.php/rca/article/view/928

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Published
2020-08-28
How to Cite
1.
Sánchez-Díaz JS, Peniche-Moguel KG, Rivera-Solís G, Martínez-Rodríguez EA, Del-Carpio-Orantes L, Pérez-Nieto OR, Zamarrón-López EI, Guerrero-Gutiérrez MA, Monares-Zepeda E. Hemodynamic monitoring with two blood gases: “a tool that does not go out of style”. Colomb. j. anesthesiol. [Internet]. 2020Aug.28 [cited 2020Sep.23];49:e928. Available from: https://www.revcolanest.com.co/index.php/rca/article/view/928
Section
Narrative review